Intel Political Accountability Guidelines November 2016

Intel Political Accountability Guidelines 
November 2016

Intel Political Accountability Guidelines November 2016

Intel Corporation is committed to the highest levels of corporate accountability. As a way to provide transparency with respect to Intel’s political contribution decision making and disclosures, Intel adopted these Intel Political Accountability Guidelines (the “Guidelines”). Intel Political Action Committee Intel created the Intel Political Action Committee (“IPAC”) in ...1980 to enable employees to support candidates whose legislative goals align with Intel’s public policy priorities. IPAC is a separate segregated fund registered with the Federal Election Commission. All funds in IPAC come from voluntary contributions from Intel’s employees and directors. Intel uses IPAC to make contributions to candidates, ballot initiatives, and political action committees where permitted by law. Corporate funds are used only for the administration of IPAC, and no corporate funds are deposited in the IPAC account. Corporate Political Activity Some states allow corporate contributions to state and local candidates, as well as ballot initiatives. Where permitted by law, and in compliance with its giving guidelines set forth below, Intel contributes to candidates, ballot initiatives, and political action committees from its corporate funds. Intel does not make contributions to so-called “527 organizations” that are not principal campaign committees, political action committees, or political parties. Intel does not use corporate funds to make independent expenditures or to fund electioneering communications. Intel does not make political contributions from its corporate funds where it is prohibited by law, such as to federal candidates. All contributions to federal candidates come from IPAC. Industry and Trade Groups Intel uses corporate funds to participate in industry and trade associations. These memberships allow Intel to work collaboratively with other companies and groups to address key public policy issues. Intel reviews these memberships annually to assess their business value and alignment with its policies and priorities. Intel discloses its payments to trade associations and other tax-exempt organizations such as 501(c)(4) organizations. Intel Political Accountability Guidelines How We Select Contribution Recipients Throughout the year, Intel receives contribution requests from candidates and political action committees. Intel officers and employees with responsibility over matters dealing with government and policy also initiate contributions requests. Decisions on political contributions, whether from IPAC or from Intel’s corporate funds, consider Intel’s business objectives, corporate policies, and public policy priorities which are outlined on its public policy and corporate responsibility websites. Intel’s approach is to make contributions in a non-partisan manner. Intel’s ultimate goal in making political contributions is to support candidates with the goal of protecting and enhancing long-term stockholder value. Intel reviews contribution requests against Intel’s political contribution policy guidelines, which take into account: historical voting records and positions on key strategic business and policy issues for Intel; leadership on key committees or within Congress; whether Intel has a large presence in a given state or district; and the impact of the proposed support on the candidate’s campaign. The weight assigned to each of these factors may vary with the circumstances in a particular case. Corporate contributions are reviewed by Intel’s Vice President of Government and Policy Group. Intel uses this formal review Read the full Intel Political Accountability Guidelines November 2016.